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Biology Research: Getting Started: Research Tips

Resources for biology research

Finding Additional Resources

Once you have found an article on your research topic, another source of information is the list of references or works cited page. Check those to see if there are any more books or articles that may be useful to you. Here are some citations from:

Stanford, J. j., & Duwel, L. E. (2013). Engaging Biology Undergraduates in the Scientific Process Through Writing a Theoretical Research Proposal. Bioscene, 39(2), 17-24.

REFERENCES

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE. 2011. Vision and change in undergraduate biology education: a call to action. Washington, D.C.: AAAS.

BLAIR, B.G., CLINE, G.R., AND W.R. BOWEN. 2007. NSF-Style peer review for teaching undergraduate grant-writing. The American Biology Teacher. 69: 34-37.

COLABROY, K.L. 2011. A writing-intensive, methods-based laboratory course for undergraduates. Biochemistry and molecular biology education : a bimonthly publication of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 39(3): 196-203

Google Scholar Citations

Some databases show a list of other articles that have cited the original one. The citing articles can be important sources of additional or updated information. One example is Google Scholar. Note that the article information shown below shows "Cited by 10." This means 10 other articles have cited this one. Clicking on the Cited by link brings up additional potential sources.

Helpful Books

How to Find Full Text Articles

Database Links

 After finding an article in a database that you would like to see, look at the end of the record for any of the links shown below to see if the full text is available. Click on either of the links to bring up an article.  

Another option you will see is Full Text Finder. This service lists  the journals to which the Library has access in print and online form. It also shows which databases they are in and what years we have.

Journal Search

On the Library homepage, click on the last radio button, Journal Titles, under the Search Library Resources box. Find the title of the journal you need, then click on the name of the database that includes a date range that covers the year of the article you need. For example:


Note: some journals will have a delay, often of a year, before full text articles are available online.

Graduate students and senior seminar students may use Interlibrary Loan if an article cannot be found in full text in any other sources.

Finding Full Text Articles in PubMed

PubMed/Medline

If you need to use the PubMed database to find health-related articles, some full text access is available. This will be indicated by the logo and name of aHhouston Cole Library-subscribed database or Free Fulltext Article button with a database name. Other sources include publisher’s websites. Linked articles will be marked with a button in the abstract view. Also, check JaxCat to see if we subscribe to the journal you need if it is not linked. Find a journal’s full name in PubMed results by hovering your mouse pointer over the abbreviation.

Finding Full Text of Articles

Look at the top right of the page for a logo and name of a Library-subscribed database or Free Fulltext Article button with a database name. .Here are some examples:

Elsevier ScienceDirect :

Wiley Online Library

Ovid Nursing Full Text 

Linked articles will be marked with a button in the abstract view. Check JaxCat to see if we subscribe to the journal you need if it is not linked.
Find a journal’s full name in your PubMed results by hovering your mouse pointer over the abbreviation.

Literature Search